Linked to a Satellite!

Imagine you are lost in one of the most remote place in Antartica or in the Amazonian jungle, it seems like all hope is gone and your life is about to reach an end… Except if you are properly linked to a satellite!


Figure 1 – Telephone linked to the satellite constellation Iridium manufactured by Thales Alenia Space

Then you can call anywhere on the earth and connect to anyone in a snap. The problem is to figure out how the satellite will know when and where to help you and that’s the moment my project comes into place. Louis described the ears of the satellite with mind-boggling antennas, I consider my work has more to do with the brain of the satellite: it must know in which region on earth it must focus its ears. To use specific words, my work is on satellite payload. But why adding a load on a satellite ? This payload is the brain of the satellite, it points the antenna and gives proper amount of power in the correct direction so you can for example communicate or surf the Internet. The payload shares these services with all the people who pays to use the satellite. This may seem easy but sometimes enabling a lot of people to use the satellite at the same time is a problem to pull one’s hair out. Just remember that time you wanted to send a text or make a call at New Year’s Eve. If the network is crowded you must find some way out, it is the same with satellite network so the focus of satellite’s resources must be on the busiest regions. On the contrary, steering the antenna towards Sahara desert would be quite pointless…

Moreover in the case you want to serve a busy area, interference between users becomes a serious problem you must take into account. If you want to have an idea of what interference is, imagine a meeting where everybody is speaking at the same time, the voice of each other would jam the conversation and it would result in a joyful cacophony. Exactly the same phenomena happens in some cases when either the satellite speaks to users on the ground or users on the ground to the satellite. Mitigating these effects is also part of my work.

To wrap it up, my work is to make satellites’ architectures smarter, more flexible to any situation that may occurs whether you are in Antartica at the brink of death or if you just want to wish a happy new year to your loved ones. The video presenting Thales Alenia Space constellation Iridium with worldwide coverage is below:



Florian’s blog

Welcome to a blog by REVOLVE Fellow Florian! In the coming weeks he will be posting updates to his new blog!