Feed Antennas

Being already in 2018 there is no doubt that satellite communications are an integral part of our life. Although not visible from earth, their importance can be met in a wide range of services. Just imagine the two most common facts: Using a positioning system to track yourself in an isolated place and using your smartphone to communicate with other people or have access to multimedia. Obviously, the satellites can provide these kind of services in an excellent way, whereas there is a great variety of further applications where their use is vital as well, such as weather prediction and space exploration to name a few.

Satellites are in principle big and complex structures, where many components are assembled together so that the satellite can be launched from the earth to the space. One of the most significant part of a satellite is the antennas. If we could compare a satellite with a human, the antennas are “the eyes and the ears”. You can easily understand that without the antennas, a satellite cannot communicate with nobody and after all has not a reason to exist!

Here at REVOLVE we are doing research around antennas for satellites as you may already know. Every one of us studies different aspects and technologies. In a very fundamental analysis, the antennas implemented and used on satellites can be categorized into two principal domains: the so called Focal Array Fed Reflectors and the Direct Radiating Antenna Arrays. In the first category belong the typical parabolic structures fed by the so called feed-antennas (usually horn antennas) which are more or less widely known, whereas in the second single antennas are formed in an array and they radiate themselves.

My subject of research concerns the feed antennas. These antennas are almost always the typical horn antennas, which are used many years now because of their great performance. Although they are described as feed antennas this might be a bit confusing or misleading as the same antennas could be used as direct radiating arrays without the presence of a reflector. In any case, my 3 year journey at REVOLVE will go through the different existing technologies around the feed antennas and we will try to find out how we could make them function better and in a more compact shape as the current solutions have a bulky profile.

At last, somebody might wonder…so what is it so important about it? There may be many things important that neither myself could even recognize, but as I mentioned earlier the satellites are big and complex structures so imagine how important would be if we could provide something smaller and lighter. Furthermore, think about that this “something” are the antennas which constitute a very basic and important part of a satellite and after all we are moving ahead to the 5G era and the next years a great increase in the multimedia usage and communication services is about to take place, so we need to confine with these rules.

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